Discredited, alarmist HPV vaccine study retracted -Consumer Health Digest

Interesting retraction on a study that was jumped on by the anti-vaccine crowd.

The open-access journal Scientific Reports has retracted a 2016 article that claimed to provide scientific support for anecdotal reports alleging that the human papilloma virus vaccine Gardasil had side effects such headaches, fatigue, and poor concentration. The article also claimed that Gardasil administered to mice damages regions of the brain to induce adverse reactions. Soon after it was published, the Respectful Insolence blog blasted its design and the evidence presented. [Orac. Torturing more mice in the name of anti-vaccine pseudoscience. Respectful Insolence Blog, November 18, 2016] The retraction announcement stated:

The Publisher is retracting this Article because the experimental approach does not support the objectives of the study. The study was designed to elucidate the maximum implication of human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine (Gardasil) in the central nervous system. However, the co-administration of pertussis toxin with high-levels of HPV vaccine is not an appropriate approach to determine neurological damage from HPV vaccine alone. The Authors do not agree with the retraction.

Although critics welcome the retraction, some have chastised the journal for taking so long to do it. [Normile D. Journal retracts paper claiming neurological damage from HPV vaccineScience, May 11, 2018] And, despite the retraction, the full text of the retracted article is still on the journal’s Web site.

HPV vaccination can prevent most of 30,000 annual cases of cancer in the U.S. caused by some types of HPV. It can prevent cancers of the cervix, vulva, vagina, penis, or anus as well as oropharyngeal cancer. HPV is transmitted through intimate skin-to-skin contact, oral sex, and most commonly through vaginal or anal sex. HPV infection can resolve on its own, but can also develop for many years before symptoms first appear. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention currently recommends HPV vaccination for girls and boy at ages 11 or 12 years, but it can begin as early as age 9. For dosage schedules, see HPV vaccines: Vaccinating your preteen or teen. CDC, updated Aug. 24, 2017.

Consumer Health Digest

http://www.quackwatch.org/00AboutQuackwatch/chd.html

Lack of local SANE staff leads to conviction of rape to be overturned- PT Leader

One of the most significant healthcare issues in the county is a lack of a trained Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) on the staff of Jefferson Healthcare. Behind the scenes a number of women have been meeting with our elected officials and members of Jefferson Healthcare to address this problem. While the following court case has more issues than just a lack of a SANE staff member, it does point out that without one, a man convicted of rape might be freed even if the victim knows him and can make the claim that he did the rape.
The problem with attempting to do what Mr. Haas said to do, is that the closest SANE trained staff is in Kitsap county. It is not likely that a victim is going to feel like driving or being driven just after being raped, to a distant county to be treated by staff and perhaps police who may or may not be supportive of her claims is not a reasonable request.
It seems that this case should be a reason that the public come to an upcoming Jefferson Healthcare Commission meeting and demand that JHC implement a SANE as quickly as possible. It could be your child, grandchild or partner next.
On April 26, Jefferson County Superior Court Judge Keith Harper ordered those charges be dismissed without prejudice, after Jefferson County Prosecuting Attorney Michael Haas moved to dismiss the case April 25, “due to a number of evidentiary problems,” according to Haas’ declaration of counsel filed with the court.
In the declaration, Haas wrote the alleged victim should have been sent to a sexual assault nurse examiner “almost immediately” after law enforcement received reports of sexual assault on her.

Neurosurgeon sues Seattle Times for libel over ‘Quantity of Care’ special investigation – iMediaEthics

It’s very unusual to see this lawsuit happening and read the article below. I’ve talked to medical professionals who have  been in operating theatres and while they were not amazed that Dr. Delashaw was running concurrent operations, they were surprised by the number of operations he allegedly oversaw. My sources told me that it is routine procedure for surgeons like Dr. Delashaw to oversee multiple operations, leaving it up to others in the room to open, close, and do the routine procedures during the operation that don’t require the surgeons’ skill and decision making ability. This frees the surgeon to move between theatres and get more done in a day. They were also not surprised that the Dr. was being paid in some way per procedure, which, while the Doctor is claiming in his lawsuit that he was ‘on salary’ it is also routine that almost all hospitals these days do grade surgeons on their ‘numbers’. It is one reason that a noted surgeon in a hospital on the Olympic Peninsula left town, that he was unhappy with being forced to ‘make the numbers.’ This pushes surgeons and other staff to live by the old maxim “if you have a hammer everything looks like a nail.”  It does not lead to better healthcare, only more healthcare, sometimes, as the Seattle Times investigation found out, whether it’s the right thing to do or not.

The Seattle Times is being sued for libel over a Pulitzer Prize-nominated series that reported on a local neurosurgeon. The Seattle Times special investigation “Quantity of Care” looked at Swedish Health’s Cherry Hill hospital, which was acquired by Providence Health & Services in 2011.

https://www.imediaethics.org/neurosurgeon-sues-seattle-times-libel-quantity-care-special-investigation/

FDA Authorizes Marketing of the New Dexcom G6® CGM Eliminating Need for Fingerstick Blood Testing for People with Diabetes | Business Wire

This seems like good news. Whether it will be available for lower income people through medicare/medicaid would mean a lot to help them monitor their glucose levels.

FDA Authorizes Marketing of the New Dexcom G6® CGM Eliminating Need for Fingerstick Blood Testing for People with Diabetes
— Read on www.businesswire.com/news/home/20180327006343/en/FDA-Authorizes-Marketing-New-Dexcom-G6®-CGM