Review contrasts veterinary drugs and homeopathic “alternatives” – Consumer Health Digest

Interesting story on Homeopathy.  There is no science behind homeopathy and this review of it by a noted association, gets to the core of the issue.

The British Veterinary Association’s journal has published two articles that place homeopathy in historical and scientific perspective. Although the articles concern veterinary practices, their conclusions are equally relevant to human drugs. The first article notes that, “For many drugs the mechanism of action is proven, and for most drugs without proven mechanisms of action, scientifically plausible mechanisms exist.” [Lees P and others. Comparison of veterinary drugs and veterinary homeopathy: Part 1. Veterinary Record, Aug 12, 2017] In contrast, the second article notes that “Homeopathy . . . is top down and faith-based; governed by arbitrary laws, invented by the founder, Hahnemann, which are immutable. As such, homeopathy is not just unscientific, it is a genuinely mystical belief system.” [Lees P and others. Comparison of veterinary drugs and veterinary homeopathy: Part 2. Veterinary Record, Aug 19/26, 2017]

 

Patient Deaths Show Darker Side of Modern Chinese Medicine – Bloomberg News

Very interesting articles by Bloomberg. Very well balanced coverage. You might need a subscription to either Bloomberg or ScribD. Or go to the library and read it there.

Early on a snowy, winter morning in January 2012, Wu Xiaoliang, a 37-year-old farmer, stopped by his local doctor to remedy a headache. At a small clinic near his village he received two injections made from traditional Chinese herbs. Hours later, villagers saw him struggling to prop himself up on his moped as he drove home. By noon, he was dead.

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-11-02/patient-deaths-show-darker-side-of-modernized-chinese-medicine

Chiropractor who treated thyroid disease sentenced for practicing medicine without a license – Consumer Health Digest

And yet another story of an alternative medical provider being found guilty of pushing beyond the scope of his license. His business license that is.

In 2017, Diem T. Nguyen, D.C., who advertised herself as “Dr. Thyroid” and offered non-drug treatment for s spectrum of thyroid disorders, has been sentenced to serve three years probation and ordered to repay two of her victims. [Johnson D. Board to decide professional fate of El Dorado Hills chiropractor convicted of practicing medicine without license. Fox 40, Sept 19, 2017] At the time of her arrest, she operated New Life Integrative Wellness clinics in Elk Grove and El Dorado Hills, California. In 2013, when she did business as NorCal Natural Integrative Healthcare, her Web site offered “A New Thyroid Treatment Approach That Moves Directly To The Underlying CAUSE Of Your Thyroid Problem. . . By Utilizing Advanced Lab Measurements and a Comprehensive Functional Approach!”

Naturopathy’s top critic profiled – The Skeptics

Worth the read. There is far too much ‘magical thinking’ given over to naturopathy with far too little oversight or insight. Here’s a story you don’t see every day. And yes, Bastyr is threatening a lawsuit to this woman, in order to shut her up. Not a good move. Makes them look just like the Big Pharma that they hate so much. One thing that strikes me as I read the article, is that much of the appeal of naturopathy could be alleviated if insurance companies dropped the requirements that medical professionals only deal with one issue at a time to get billed. Patients and doctors alike hate this.

Quartz Media has published the remarkable story of Britt Hermes, a former practitioner who abandoned naturopathy when she concluded that what she had been taught was not valid. The article states: “For the past few years, after realizing she had been swindled in her education, Hermes has waged a war on naturopathy. On blogs and in online publications, she has opened a window into a profession that resists external scrutiny of its training and practices.” [Rathi A. The journey of a “doctor” who joined the cult of alternative medicine and then broke out of it Quartz, Sept 30, 2017] Last year, Hermes’s blog, “Naturopathic Diaries,” won the Ockham award for the best blog of the year given by The Skeptics magazine.

“Their training…amounts to a small fraction of that of medical doctors who practice primary care,” Atwood wrote. “An examination of their literature, moreover, reveals that it is replete with pseudoscientific, ineffective, unethical, and potentially dangerous practices.”

Quartz article on Naturopaths

Adulteration by synthetic therapeutic substances of traditional Chinese medicines in Taiwan. – PubMed – NCBI

“The controversies regarding the combination of synthetic therapeutic substances and traditional Chinese medicines without adequate labeling should be resolved through regulatory actions for better safety of drug use.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9115061

Adulteration of proprietary Chinese medicines and health products with undeclared drugs: experience of a tertiary toxicology laboratory in Hong Kong – Ching – 2017 – British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology – Wiley Online Library

Proprietary Chinese medicines (pCMs) and health products, generally believed to be natural and safe, are gaining popularity worldwide. However, the safety of pCMs and health products has been severely compromised by the practice of adulteration. The current study aimed to examine the problem of adulteration of pCMs and health products in Hong Kong.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bcp.13420/full

NYTimes: In Hong Kong, Folk Remedies Are Sickening Patients

The rise of use of Chinese traditional remedies has been going on for sometime here on the West Coast in particular. My late wife tried many substances in a vain attempt to save her life. It always made me wonder as to who was overseeing the possible abuse of these remedies, and many of them are available on the Internet with no regulation at all.