Trump administration freezes risk-adjustment payments – Modern Healthcare

The administration continues it’s battle to destroy protecting middle and low income folks from medical financial ruin continues.

The Trump administration is halting billions of dollars of payments to insurers under the Affordable Care Act’s risk-adjustment program, a move that further disrupts the insurance market and could lead to more premium increases next year.

http://www.modernhealthcare.com/article/20180708/NEWS/180709931?utm_source=modernhealthcare&utm_medium=email&utm_content=20180708-NEWS-180709931&utm_campaign=mh-alert

 

Bad bedside manner: Bank loans signed in the hospital leave patients vulnerable – Seattle Times/Kaiser Health News

Just when we think the American healthcare system can’t get any worse, hospitals and banks figure out a way to take us further into debt. Just what a person who is brought into the ER wants to see, a banker show up. It’s like a sick joke.

Here’s a very telling stat from this article: In 2016, the federal government estimates, consumers spent $352.5 billion out-of-pocket on health care.

We *think* we have it good. We could have paid for universal healthcare with that amount.  You are essentially being taxed on that money, but it accrues to the sickest of us and the bulk of that money is spent in the last 6 months of life. To put it in perspective the US spent $584 B on defense, $588B on Medicare and $368B on Medicaid.

https://www.seattletimes.com/nation-world/bad-bedside-manner-bank-loans-signed-in-the-hospital-leave-patients-vulnerable/

Despite Prod By ACA, Tax-Exempt Hospitals Slow To Expand Community Benefits – Kaiser Health

Interesting article that has implications here on the Peninsula, especially for Jefferson Health Care.

The federal health law’s efforts to get nonprofit hospitals to provide more community-wide benefits in exchange for their lucrative tax status has gotten off to a slow start, new research suggests. And some experts predict that a recent repeal of a key provision of the law could further strain the effort.

The increased emphasis on community-wide benefits was mandated by the Affordable Care Act. The health law required hospitals that meet federal tax standards to be nonprofits to perform a community health needs assessment (CHNA) every three years, followed by implementing a strategy to deal with issues confronting the community, such as preventing violence or lowering the rates of diabetes.

A study released Monday in the journal Health Affairs shows spending in these areas has remained relatively stagnant.