EVENT: Public invited to comment on Sexual Assault Nurse program

All are invited to a community discussion on development of a Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) program for Jefferson County.

Currently, Jefferson County victims of sexual assault who wish to prosecute their attackers must travel to Harrison or Olympic Medical Center for the specialized forensic SANE exams needed to collect evidence. Jefferson Healthcare’s administration created an exploratory committee to evaluate the feasibility of developing a Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) Program for our county so victims would be less likely to need to travel. The committee completed a draft proposal to create a SANE program run out of the hospital. Community feedback will be helpful to ensure the proposal is crafted to best meet the needs of the victims in a sustainable manner. Once finalized, the proposal will be presented to the Hospital Commissioners for their consideration.

October 4, 2018

4:30-6:00

Dirksen Conference Room

Jefferson Healthcare

Molly Parker, MD, MPH

Medical Director of Population Health

Jefferson County Dems endorse all candidates.

In a high spirited meeting running over three hours, Jefferson County Democrats endorsed all candidates presented on their slate. The entire list can be viewed under the tab at the top of this page, titled 2018 Elections.

The three candidates that drew the most debate were Joe Nole for Sheriff, Maria Cantwell for Senator and Derek Kilmer for House of Representatives.

The debate on Joe Nole’s endorsement came from a group of people who brought up issues that had happened under his temporary leadership as interim sheriff in the months before Dave Stanko’s election. They also discussed issues of aggressive policing, (not by Joe but by officers under his command at that point) and positions that Joe was claimed to have made. They also were in support of Sheriff Stanko. Ultimately, a series of speakers who have worked with Mr. Nole, including outgoing County Commissioner Kathleen Kler, allowed for a clear win for endorsement.

Opposition to Derek Kilmer came from what is known as the “Progressives”, who primarily were supporters of Senator Bernie Sanders. They identified a number of issues that Rep. Kilmer has not taken a stand on, or has supported. Single Payer Healthcare, bills that supported Israel to the exclusion of Palestinians, and his vote supporting the massive recent military budget (HR5515) and tax bills, which far exceeded the demands of President Trump. To be clear, many Democrats ended up supporting the bills as there were numerous items added that they requested. Representative Kilmer also has not achieved anything of substance around the expansion of the Navy airbase and it’s subsequent noise issues for the entire north Sound and Strait. He has done nothing of substance to also protect the west end of the Olympic Peninsula from being used as a Navy training ground with low flying jets over the west side of the Olympic National Park. These issues have engendered huge meeting turnouts and thousands of letters of support for him to take action. However, as of this writing, his efforts have seemed very unsubstantial.  Representative Kilmer  has been endorsed 100% by Planned Parenthood, Human Rights Campaign, and to a lesser degree, by the ACLU (88%) and The League for Conservation Voters (92%). His entire voting record can be viewed here:

https://www.govtrack.us/congress/members/derek_kilmer/412583

Similar issues were raised about Senator Maria Cantwell. Senator Cantwell did vote no on the Defense Appropriations Act. Senator Cantwell has been endorsed 100% by Planned Parenthood, Human Rights Campaign, and to a lesser degree, by the ACLU (88%) and The League for Conservation Voters (91%). Her voting record can be found at

https://www.govtrack.us/congress/members/maria_cantwell/300018

Supporters of the two argued for Democratic unity in the face of goals to take back the House and Senate, along with positive bills that both had supported. Ultimately, both easily won endorsement.

 

 

 

 

OMC faces massive cut in Medicare reimbursements – PDN

Very bad news coming out of Washington DC. For healthcare on the Olympic Peninsula.These changes are made from the Trump administration and are the result of him being elected in 2016.

PORT ANGELES — Olympic Medical Center is urging people to comment on a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services proposal that would significantly cut reimbursements for the hospital’s off-site clinics — costing the public hospital $47 million over the next decade.

https://www.peninsuladailynews.com/news/omc-faces-massive-cut-in-medicare-reimbursements/

Lisa Holt resigns from Jefferson Healthcare

Jefferson County Healthcare announced the resignation of Lisa Holt, chief ancillary officer for the hospital. Ms Holt, had been with JHC since May 2013, according to her profile on LinkedIn. Prior to that she had been Nursing Director of Education at Centura Institute in Orlando Florida. There was no word on what Ms. Holt will be doing next. But the unexpected resignation and her immediate leaving the senior position seemed difficult to understand, since she appeared to have a very positive relationship with the rest of the Senior Leadership Group surrounding Mr. Glenn. There was no one immediately named as a successor.  It would seem that Mr. Glenn would have wanted her to help with a transition period, and that JHC would have made an announcement thanking her for her work. As of Monday morning, her photograph had been removed from the JHC web site leadership team.

Turnover at JHC appears to above average. Mr. Glenn has admitted to turnover being an issue in public meetings in the past few years.  However, it has never apparently been a significant issue in his reviews, completed by the Hospital Commissioners.

Measles outbreak in British Columbia

A medical provider I know in B.C. has sent me information about the newly discovered measles outbreak north of the border.

Measles warning issued at Metro Vancouver high school . It’s the third recent case of measles in Metro Vancouver after cases were reported at Vancouver International Airport and Moody Park Pool in New Westminster.

Travelers are being alerted to one case of measles in an infectious individual who traveled through Vancouver International Airport (YVR) twice in recent weeks.

Flight information:
  • July 30: Air Canada flight 0004 departing from Tokyo’s Narita International Airport (NRT) at 4:05 p.m. and arriving at Vancouver International Airport (YVR) at 9:25 a.m.  The passenger with measles was at YVR prior to boarding the next flight.
  • July 30: Air Canada Jazz flight 8125 departing Vancouver International Airport (YVR) at 1:50 p.m. and arriving at Portland International Airport (PDX) at 2:47 p.m.
  • Aug 6: Alaska Airlines flight 2536 departing Portland International Airport (PDX) at 9:45 a.m. and arriving at Vancouver International Airport (YVR) at 10:55 a.m.
The individual also traveled on a cruise ship to Alaska:
  • Aug 6: Norwegian Cruise Lines (voyage number 2018080806), departed Vancouver at 4 p.m. with a destination of Seward, Alaska.

For more on this story, go to the B.C. Centre for Disease Control web site.

http://www.bccdc.ca/about/news-stories/news-releases/2018/yvr-measles-alert-aug-14

 

In Life’s Last Moments, Open a Window – NY Times

This weekend, the New York Times published an opinion piece by Rachel Clark, the author of “Your Life in My Hands: A Junior Doctor’s Story”. She is also a physician with the National Health Service of Great Britain. It reminded me of my late wife’s last days. In the book I wrote about Karen’s life and death, “The Good Bits” is the final scene with her:

I had a thought. I moved to the double doors and unbolted them. “Let’s wheel her bed into the fresh air where she can hear the birds singing. Get her under the huge fir. She loved to read under it.”

“That’s a great idea,” Debbie replied.

Isaac helped lift the bed over the threshold. We turned it so that Karen’s head faced the edge of the deck railing. Just beyond the railing spread the boughs of an eighty-foot Douglas fir, almost touching the roof line of the porch. The day was sunny and hot and even though it was still early. The scent of fir was intense.

From here, Karen could smell the sea, the fir tree and hear the birds. Let her think of the thousands of nights under the stars, if she was still thinking. She loved to sleep outside, without a tent. I remembered a night camping on the eastern slope of the North Cascades and her description of the mountains of Afghanistan. “It was the most beautiful place I’ve ever camped,” she had said. We had slept that night in the Cascades in each other’s arms, under those stars.

Dr. Clark, also describes a similar scene.

Another patient, whom I admitted in July with about a week to live, was mostly concerned that I keep the windows open, so that he could “keep on feeling the breeze on my face and listening to that blackbird outside.” I rushed to make sure of it.

It is important that as we work to help loved ones through their final days, that we stay open to some simple, basic ideas. Having the ability to die under the stars, or under a favorite tree is simple, yet so very hard to think about in the moment. Be willing to take small steps for comfort.

Here is the link to Dr. Clark’s article.