Discredited, alarmist HPV vaccine study retracted -Consumer Health Digest

Interesting retraction on a study that was jumped on by the anti-vaccine crowd.

The open-access journal Scientific Reports has retracted a 2016 article that claimed to provide scientific support for anecdotal reports alleging that the human papilloma virus vaccine Gardasil had side effects such headaches, fatigue, and poor concentration. The article also claimed that Gardasil administered to mice damages regions of the brain to induce adverse reactions. Soon after it was published, the Respectful Insolence blog blasted its design and the evidence presented. [Orac. Torturing more mice in the name of anti-vaccine pseudoscience. Respectful Insolence Blog, November 18, 2016] The retraction announcement stated:

The Publisher is retracting this Article because the experimental approach does not support the objectives of the study. The study was designed to elucidate the maximum implication of human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine (Gardasil) in the central nervous system. However, the co-administration of pertussis toxin with high-levels of HPV vaccine is not an appropriate approach to determine neurological damage from HPV vaccine alone. The Authors do not agree with the retraction.

Although critics welcome the retraction, some have chastised the journal for taking so long to do it. [Normile D. Journal retracts paper claiming neurological damage from HPV vaccineScience, May 11, 2018] And, despite the retraction, the full text of the retracted article is still on the journal’s Web site.

HPV vaccination can prevent most of 30,000 annual cases of cancer in the U.S. caused by some types of HPV. It can prevent cancers of the cervix, vulva, vagina, penis, or anus as well as oropharyngeal cancer. HPV is transmitted through intimate skin-to-skin contact, oral sex, and most commonly through vaginal or anal sex. HPV infection can resolve on its own, but can also develop for many years before symptoms first appear. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention currently recommends HPV vaccination for girls and boy at ages 11 or 12 years, but it can begin as early as age 9. For dosage schedules, see HPV vaccines: Vaccinating your preteen or teen. CDC, updated Aug. 24, 2017.

Consumer Health Digest

http://www.quackwatch.org/00AboutQuackwatch/chd.html

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s